kafod-2

Album Review – Pasos by Kafod

By David Hernández exclusively for World Prog-Nation.
English version by Alfredo Iraheta

(Spanish version to follow)

Progressive rock bands that have achieved great worldwide recognition have a certain striking feature that invites us to enter into the musical world that they propose. Often times, such bands include, for example an instrument that usually has no place in other context within the band’s music, and such instrument makes us think immediately of that band, (did that not happen to you when you heard the flute that characterizes Jethro Tull?). When we talk about Kafod, there are many things that stand out from this project besides a sound forged over several years of hard work since its formation in 2008. Kafod is a band whose core is family, and today the fruit of that long musical labor is represented in its latest release titled Pasos (Steps).

Kafod is made up of Carlos Cruz, composer, guitarist and bassist; Paula Demarco, who is Carlos’ wife, on keyboards; and Lucas Carrasco, a young and talented guitarist who joined this musical family, first as a guest before becoming a full-time member. Kafod has two drummers: Esteban Silva, another young musician who recently joined this promising musical project, and Juan Salvador Cruz Demarco, son of Carlos and Paula, who is barely seven years old and has been the band’s drummer since he was only five years old. It is impossible to ignore the exceptional abilities of young Juan Salvador on the drums, His skill has caught the attention of many viewers. Even Pink Floyd’s Nick Mason shared a video of the band playing ‘Another Brick in the Wall‘, which catapulted him into international recognition.

Kafod onstage – Photo by Edmundo Ponce

Now that we know a little about the members of Kafod, it is time to delve into their most recent release, Pasos, which was recorded in 2016, with compositions by Carlos Cruz, Paula Demarco and Elicura Chihuailaf, who participated in the creation of the song ‘Toki’, written in Mapudungún, the official language of the Mapuche people.

This album has 10 songs where we find a sound that immediately transports us to the progressive rock that took shape in the 80’s with bands like Marillion, IQ or Pendragon. Other icons of the genre, such as Genesis and Pink Floyd also leave a marked influence, which undoubtedly permeates almost any progressive band today, as the music of these British musical giants has managed to transcend geographical borders and time. Carlos’s powerful voice keeps us very attentive to every word he utters as the songs progress. It is there where the lyrics merge with the musical stage that Kafod has built for our delight. This combination takes the listener on a journey within the universe of each song, showing us a reflection of complex human sensations.

The album opens with ‘Cada Vez’ (Every Time), a song that brings with it an atmospheric introduction built on Paula’s keyboards, and sends us straight to an energetic guitar riff that intertwines with the melody produced by the synthesizer. The cohesive work of the band on this song is an incentive to continue to listen to the album without stopping for a single moment. Not only do we hear the strong influence from the legacy of classic progressive rock, but we are also introduced to a musical jewel that, as of now, has almost exclusively been enjoyed by the inhabitants of Chile, Kafod’s home country.

Following the pace established at the album’s opener, we find ‘Respirar Bajo el Agua’ (Breathing Under Water). The song’s hypnotic percussion pulse is typical of Latin American music, and Carlos’ powerful voice guides us to a keyboard segment that sounds as if diluted in silence and the conclusion of the song. As we progress through the album, it is easy to find familiar sounds, particularly in Carlos’ voice, which reminds us of such iconic voices like Geddy Lee and Fish (Marillion) in songs like ‘Buscando La Felicidad’ (Looking for Happiness) and ‘Story Of Our Lives’, the only song in the album with lyrics in English.

Kafod “Pasos” cover – Illustration by Paula Demarco

It is worth noting that many of these songs have the much-desired feature of being very friendly to the ears, even to those of people who are not familiar with progressive rock. The chorus in ‘Consciente’ (Conscious) is like sweet goodness for the listener, and yet it is apparent that this song’s arrangement features many delightfully complex details, especially the bass line. One of the most interesting songs of the album is the title track ‘Pasos’, because it manages to take the atmospheric effect of the previous songs one step further, thanks to captivating lyrics that ride from beginning to end on the magic produced by an omnipresent acoustic guitar.

Songs like ‘Ventana’ (Windows), ‘Alas’ (Wings) and ‘Por Ti’ (For You) keep the 80’s progressive rock flavor, making it clear that Kadof does not seek to show us exaggerated displays of virtuosity. On this album we will not find endless guitar solos, or high-speed keyboard segments that are impossible to follow. On the contrary, the focus is on building strong songs, where the lyrics are in perfect harmony with the music. There is no ego, or rivalry within the instrumental sections. At the same time however, we do not run the risk of colliding with bubble gum pop. Clearly Pasos is a work where the compositional character and the quality of the performance prevail without falling into the temptation of virtuosity displays that have characterized many modern bands that raise the flag of progressive rock or similar genres.

Kafod closes his album with another jewel that is impossible to ignore! We speak of ‘Toki’, a song written in the Mapudungún language and in Spanish. The song begins as a psychedelic instrumental passage in the style of Pink Floyd, where words float slowly in an ancestral language, unintelligible to those born under the culture disseminated by European settlers, to finally disappear in the middle of music. But the song does not end there, as Carlos’s voice again plays in our ears, like a scream coming out of the abyss in a brief but impressive vocal intervention.

In general, Pasos is an album that has collected many influences within progressive rock and also within the sounds of Latin America to develop a musical language of its own. This is an honest work that transmits the musicians’ love for well-crafted music. Pasos is an example of the excellent musical quality that is produced in this region of the world. It is apparent that Kafod makes an effort to stay true to its roots. This is also proven through the band’s strong family ties, and also where each of its members is strongly linked by the bonds brought upon through music.

Photo by Edmundo Ponce

Las bandas de rock progresivo que han alcanzado gran reconocimiento a nivel mundial suelen tener alguna característica muy llamativa y que nos seduce a entrar en el mundo musical que nos proponen. Muchas suelen incluir algún instrumento que usualmente no tiene cabida en otros contextos, y así logramos pensar en esa banda inmediatamente, (¿acaso eso no les ocurrió cuando conocieron el particular sonido de flauta que caracteriza a Jethro Tull?). Pues bien, cuando hablamos de Kafod, hay muchas cosas que resaltan de este proyecto, además de un sonido trabajado a lo largo de varios años de esfuerzo desde su formación en el año 2008. Pues bien, Kafod es una banda cuyo núcleo es la familia, y hoy el fruto de ese largo recorrido musical está representado en su última producción titulada ‘Pasos’.

Conformada por Carlos Cruz, compositor, guitarrista y bajista; Paula Demarco, -quien es la esposa de Carlos- en los teclados; Lucas Carrasco, un joven y talentoso guitarrista que se unió a esta familia musical, primero como invitado y luego se convirtió en un miembro de tiempo completo. Kafod cuenta con dos bateristas: Esteban Silva, otro joven integrante de este grupo que se ha sumado a este prometedor proyecto musical, y Juan Salvador Cruz Demarco, hijo de Carlos y Paula, quien hoy apenas cuenta con siete años de vida y es baterista de la banda desde que tenía tan sólo cinco años. Es imposible ignorar las habilidades excepcionales del pequeño Juan Salvador en la batería, y esto ha llamado la atención de muchos espectadores. Incluso Nick Mason compartió un video de la banda tocando ‘Another Brick in the Wall’, hecho que lo catapultó hacia el reconocimiento internacional.

Ahora que conocemos un poco acerca de los integrantes de Kafod, es momento de adentrarnos en su más reciente producción, ‘Pasos’, que fue grabada el año pasado, contando con composiciones de Carlos Cruz, Paula Demarco y Elicura Chihuailaf, quien participó en la creación de la canción ‘Toki’, escrita en mapudungún, la lengua oficial del pueblo mapuche.

Este disco cuenta con 10 canciones donde encontramos un sonido que nos transporta inmediatamente al rock progresivo que se gestó en los años 80 con bandas como Marillion, IQ o Pendragon. También hay una notable influencia de otros íconos del género, como Genesis y Pink Floyd, que sin duda permea en casi cualquier banda progresiva de la actualidad, pues la música de estos referentes británicos ha logrado trascender las fronteras geográficas y el tiempo. La poderosa voz de Carlos nos mantiene muy atentos a cada palabra que pronuncia mientras avanzan las canciones; allí las letras se funden con el escenario musical que Kafod ha construido para nuestro deleite. Esta combinación hace que el oyente ingrese en el universo que hay dentro de cada canción, mostrándonos un reflejo de las complejas sensaciones humanas.

El disco abre con ‘Cada vez’, una canción que trae consigo una introducción atmosférica construida en los teclados de Paula, y nos lanza directo a una enérgica guitarra que se entrelaza con la melodía producida por el sintetizador. El trabajo conjunto de la banda en este tema es un aliciente para seguir avanzando por el disco sin detenernos un solo instante. En esta primera canción no sólo se nota la fuerte influencia del legado del rock progresivo clásico, sino que asistimos a un encuentro con una joya que, por el momento, han disfrutado exclusivamente los habitantes del país austral.

Siguiendo la línea marcada al principio por ‘Cada vez’ nos encontramos con ‘Respirar bajo el agua’, cuyo hipnótico pulso de percusión típico de la música latinoamericana, nos conduce a través de la poderosa voz de Carlos hasta llegar a un segmento de teclados que se diluye en el silencio y el final de la canción. A medida que vamos avanzando por el disco, es fácil encontrarnos con sonidos familiares, especialmente en la voz de Carlos, que nos remiten a la voz de Geddy Lee y Fish en canciones como ‘Buscando la felicidad’ y ‘Story of our lives’, único tema del disco con letras en inglés.

Vale la pena decir que muchas de estas canciones tienen la particularidad de ser muy amigables para los oídos, incluso de las personas que no están familiarizadas con el rock progresivo. El estribillo de ‘Consciente’ es como un dulce para el oyente, y sin embargo, se puede notar que es una composición con muchos detalles sorprendentes, sobre todo en la línea de bajo. Uno de los temas más interesantes del disco es ‘Pasos’, porque logra llevar el efecto atmosférico de las canciones anteriores un paso adelante, gracias a una letra cautivadora de principio a fin que cabalga sobre la magia producida por una guitarra acústica omnipresente.

Canciones como ‘Ventana’, ‘Alas’ y ‘Por ti’ mantienen la línea del rock progresivo de los años 80, dejando claro que Kadof no busca mostrarnos un despliegue de virtuosismo exagerado; en este disco no encontraremos eternos solos de guitarra o segmentos de teclado a una velocidad imposible de seguir. Por el contrario, prevalecen las canciones donde la letra está en perfecta armonía con la música, sin que exista un protagonismo o rivalidad con la sección instrumental y tampoco corremos el riesgo de chocar con alguna canción de pop. Claramente se trata de un trabajo donde prima el carácter compositivo y la calidad en la interpretación sin caer en la tentación del virtuosismo que ha caracterizado a las bandas modernas que levantan la bandera del rock progresivo o géneros similares.

Kafod cierra su disco con otra joya que es imposible pasar por alto: hablamos de Toki, una canción escrita en lengua mapudungún y español. Inicia como un pasaje instrumental psicodélico al mejor estilo de Pink Floyd, donde poco a poco flotan las palabras en una lengua ancestral, ininteligible para los que hemos nacido bajo la cultura diseminada por el hombre blanco, para finalmente desaparecer en medio de la música. Pero allí no acaba esta canción, pues la voz aguda de Carlos vuelve a tocar nuestros tímpanos como un grito saliendo del abismo en una breve pero impresionante intervención vocal.

Photo by Edmundo Ponce

En general, ‘Pasos’ es un disco que ha recogido muchas influencias dentro del rock progresivo y los sonidos propios de Latinoamérica para elaborar un lenguaje propio. Estamos ante un trabajo sincero que transmite amor por la música bien elaborada; es una muestra de la excelente calidad musical que se produce en esta región del mundo. Se puede sentir que Kafod hace un esfuerzo por mantenerse fiel a sus raíces, y esto también queda demostrado al ser una banda familiar, donde cada uno de sus miembros están ligados fuertemente por los lazos que construye la música.


Listen to ‘Pasos’, the title track and second single from the album:


Kafod on the web:

Official website:
https://www.kafod.cl/

Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/Kafod/

YouTube channel:
https://www.youtube.com/user/kafod

Twitter:
https://twitter.com/carloskafod


2017 World Prog-Nation – All rights reserved

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *